Opening Remarks

Professor Sir Jim McDonald
Principal and Vice Chancellor of the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow UK

Early Career Member Keynote

Dr Alison Hobro
Assistant Professor Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University

Clinical Keynote

Prof Gérard Thiéfin

Bridging the translational gap for medical applications of spectroscopy : a clinician’s perspective

Translation Keynote

Dr Phil Heraud
Research Fellow, Microbiology, Monash University

Translation Keynote

Prof. Anita Mahadevan Jansen

Predicting preterm birth with Raman spectroscopy in patients

Novel Spectroscopic Instrumentation of Future Clinical Interest Keynote

David Klug
Professor of Chemical Biophysics, Imperial College London

Progress in tissue imaging, protein structural analysis and the analysis of complex biofluids using EVV Two Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

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Dr Phil Heraud

Research Fellow, Microbiology, Monash University

Phil Heraud is a Director of the Centre for Biospectroscopy and Group Leader in the Biomedical Discovery Institute and Department of Microbiology at Monash University in Melbourne. Phil is a pioneer researcher in Biospectroscopy founding the introduction of vibrational spectroscopy into oceanography, neurological imaging and stem cell science. More recently he has been spearheading the development of new diagnostics for blood borne infectious diseases based on vibrational spectroscopy. This translation work has led to the formation of two companies: Biotech Resources and Total Blood Profile.

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David Klug

Professor David Klug is Chair of Chemical Biophysics in the Chemistry Department at Imperial College London and founder of three technology spin-out companies. He founded the Imperial College Institute of Chemical Biology (ICB) a network of over 80 research groups collaborating across the physical sciences-life sciences interface, and was chair for 15 years. His own research work is focused on two groups of technologies for biomolecular analysis. The first is microfluidic and single molecule analysis techniques for single cell analysis, cell systems biology and ultrasensitive diagnostics. The second is advanced spectroscopies, including optical analogues of 2DNMR, for structure-function analysis of proteins, protein complexes, analysis of complex mixtures and tissue imaging.

Further reading

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Prof. Anita Mahadevan Jansen

Predicting preterm birth with Raman spectroscopy in patients

Anita Mahadevan-Jansen: Dr. Mahadevan-Jansen translates optical techniques for clinical detection of tissue physiology and pathology. Her primary research at the Vanderbilt Biophotonics Center, is to investigate the applications of optical spectroscopies and imaging for disease diagnosis and guidance of therapy. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Physics from the University of Bombay (Mumbai), India, and a master’s and PhD degrees in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. She joined the Vanderbilt engineering faculty in 1996. She is currently the Orrin H. Ingram Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Vanderbilt University and holds a secondary appointment in the Department of Neurological Surgery. She serves as Director of the Vanderbilt Biophotonics Center, Director of the Vanderbilt branch of the Center for Integration of Research in Teaching and Learning (CIRTL), an NSF funded 22-institution center as well as Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Vanderbilt University.
Dr Mahadevan-Jansen is an associate editor of Neurophotonics as well as Applied Spectroscopy and serves as a reviewer of more than 20 journals and as chair of numerous professional conferences. She has authored over 75 peer-reviewed publications and is funded by the NIH, NSF, DOD and AFOSR for her research. She is currently on the Board of Directors of the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE) and is a fellow of SPIE as well as the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE).

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Prof Gérard Thiéfin

Bridging the translational gap for medical applications of spectroscopy : a clinician's perspective

Gérard Thiéfin received his MD from the University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne in 1985 and specialized in Hepatology and Gastroenterology. He worked as assistant at the department of Hepato-Gastroenterology, Reims University Hospital, in 1986-1987 then followed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Center for Ulcer Research and Education, University of California School of Medecine, Los Angeles, in 1987-1988. He worked under the direction of PH Guth in a laboratory devoted to the study of mucosal blood flow in gastroduodenal ulcer pathogenesis. After 4 years as assistant and hospital practitioner at the department of Hepato-Gastroenterology of Reims University Hospital, he became professor in Hepatology and Gastroenterology in 1991, then head of the department of Hepato-Gastroenterology from 1998 to 2011 and finally head of a multidisciplinary medico-surgical department at Reims University Hospital. Besides, he is teacher-researcher in the CNRS unit UMR 7369- MEDyC at the university of Reims Champagne-Ardenne where his research focuses on biomedical application of vibrational spectroscopy in the field of hepatobiliary cancers and hepatic fibrosis.

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Dr Alison Hobro

Assistant Professor Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University

Alison Hobro obtained her PhD from the University of Manchester, UK, developing Raman, Raman Optical Acitvity (ROA) and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) for the analysis of RNA structure. This was followed by a postdoctoral position at Vienna University of Technology, Austria, using stand-off Raman spectroscopy for the detection of explosives, as well as Raman and infrared (IR) imaging for the analysis of cells, tissues and small multicellular organisms. She is currently an Assistant Professor at the Immunology Frontier Research Center (IFReC) at Osaka University, Japan. Her research focuses on using Raman spectroscopy and imaging to investigate the interactions occurring between hosts and pathogens during infection.

Further reading

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